News Blog for Seattle's Maple Leaf Neighborhood

 

City asks: “Do you like the way your neighborhood is changing?”

March 9th, 2015 by Mike

Change has arrived in Maple Leaf — $1.3 million houses, traffic gridlock on arterials (Roosevelt Way Northeast, 15th Avenue Northeast, Fifth Avenue Northeast), our new park! — and the city wants to know what we and other neighborhoods think about these changes.

Examining population or job growth is one way to measure change but what about lesser-known measures like transit ridership, tree canopy cover, or academic performance?

We want to hear from you! Tell us what you think tells us the most about how your neighborhood is changing by taking our quick poll to indicate which five topics are most important to you. It’s impossible to measure how a city neighborhood changes with just one measure.

The survey suggests 21 different topics, from crime to farmers’ markets, and also has the option to write in a different topic. The link to the poll is:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SEA2035

The poll, by the city’s Department of Planning Urban Development, is tied to Seattle’s Urban Village Strategy and the city’s Comprehensive Plan.

As as it happens, our news partner The Seattle Times has an updated interactive tool: Mapping King County’s Disappearing Middle Class.

Keying off newly released data — “since 2000, 95 percent of new households in King County have been either rich or poor. A mere 5 percent could be considered middle income” – The Times has broken down new growth by census tract.

Of interest, in southwest Maple Leaf (census tract 20) 57 percent of new growth has been in high-income households. By contrast, just across Interstate 5 from Northgate (census tract 210) 100 percent of growth has been low income.

→ No CommentsTags: , ,

City asks: "Do you like the way your neighborhood is changing?"

March 9th, 2015 by Mike

Change has arrived in Maple Leaf — $1.3 million houses, traffic gridlock on arterials (Roosevelt Way Northeast, 15th Avenue Northeast, Fifth Avenue Northeast), our new park! — and the city wants to know what we and other neighborhoods think about these changes.

Examining population or job growth is one way to measure change but what about lesser-known measures like transit ridership, tree canopy cover, or academic performance?

We want to hear from you! Tell us what you think tells us the most about how your neighborhood is changing by taking our quick poll to indicate which five topics are most important to you. It’s impossible to measure how a city neighborhood changes with just one measure.

The survey suggests 21 different topics, from crime to farmers’ markets, and also has the option to write in a different topic. The link to the poll is:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SEA2035

The poll, by the city’s Department of Planning Urban Development, is tied to Seattle’s Urban Village Strategy and the city’s Comprehensive Plan.

As as it happens, our news partner The Seattle Times has an updated interactive tool: Mapping King County’s Disappearing Middle Class.

Keying off newly released data — “since 2000, 95 percent of new households in King County have been either rich or poor. A mere 5 percent could be considered middle income” – The Times has broken down new growth by census tract.

Of interest, in southwest Maple Leaf (census tract 20) 57 percent of new growth has been in high-income households. By contrast, just across Interstate 5 from Northgate (census tract 210) 100 percent of growth has been low income.

→ No CommentsTags: , ,

"No way are we more trashy than Ravenna!"

February 2nd, 2011 by Mike

One of our readers, Megan, e-mailed to take note of a $50,000 challenge from our garbage and recycling company, CleanScapes.

To help communities along the road to zero waste, CleanScapes is challenging residents and neighborhoods to reduce their waste with the 2nd Annual Neighborhood Waste Reduction Rewards competition. The reward? A $50,000 community project, built in your neighborhood and maintained by CleanScapes.

Now, as it happens, Maple Leaf is about to get a new park, and we’re sure it could use a $50 grand project.

But Megan points to a story by our news partners The Seattle Times that as of the end of January Ravenna is leading the contest.

“No way are we more trashy than Ravenna,” she writes.

Ah, but how to tell where we end and other neighborhoods begin? It’s a subject we’ve harped on before.

On this map, from CleanScapes, most of Maple Leaf is in the “Thursday North” collection area. But it looks like our contest turf includes a lot of … Pinehurst!

Ravenna is in the Tuesday North zone, which seems to us to include a lot of Roosevelt.

More seriously, the confusion over neighborhood boundaries can also cause confusing crime reporting. At last week’s community council general meeting, Diane Horswill, a community crime coordinator, passed out a list of 19 burglaries in Maple Leaf in the last three months.

We noticed that Maple Leaf Life has reported on at least four additional burglaries during that time period. The reason for the discrepancy is that Horswill used a map from the Seattle City Clerk’s office that draws Maple Leaf’s southern  boundary at Northeast 85th Street. She writes:

I chose to use these maps because I am trying to avoid overlapping which can result in double reporting. This happened last Fall when the same burglary incidents were attributed to Maple Leaf, Ravenna and Roosevelt. This tends to result in a lot of unnecessary fear in the community.

→ 3 CommentsTags: , , , ,

“No way are we more trashy than Ravenna!”

February 2nd, 2011 by Mike

One of our readers, Megan, e-mailed to take note of a $50,000 challenge from our garbage and recycling company, CleanScapes.

To help communities along the road to zero waste, CleanScapes is challenging residents and neighborhoods to reduce their waste with the 2nd Annual Neighborhood Waste Reduction Rewards competition. The reward? A $50,000 community project, built in your neighborhood and maintained by CleanScapes.

Now, as it happens, Maple Leaf is about to get a new park, and we’re sure it could use a $50 grand project.

But Megan points to a story by our news partners The Seattle Times that as of the end of January Ravenna is leading the contest.

“No way are we more trashy than Ravenna,” she writes.

Ah, but how to tell where we end and other neighborhoods begin? It’s a subject we’ve harped on before.

On this map, from CleanScapes, most of Maple Leaf is in the “Thursday North” collection area. But it looks like our contest turf includes a lot of … Pinehurst!

Ravenna is in the Tuesday North zone, which seems to us to include a lot of Roosevelt.

More seriously, the confusion over neighborhood boundaries can also cause confusing crime reporting. At last week’s community council general meeting, Diane Horswill, a community crime coordinator, passed out a list of 19 burglaries in Maple Leaf in the last three months.

We noticed that Maple Leaf Life has reported on at least four additional burglaries during that time period. The reason for the discrepancy is that Horswill used a map from the Seattle City Clerk’s office that draws Maple Leaf’s southern  boundary at Northeast 85th Street. She writes:

I chose to use these maps because I am trying to avoid overlapping which can result in double reporting. This happened last Fall when the same burglary incidents were attributed to Maple Leaf, Ravenna and Roosevelt. This tends to result in a lot of unnecessary fear in the community.

→ 3 CommentsTags: , , , ,

City prepares for Neighbor Appreciation Day, asks what makes your neighbors so great?

January 28th, 2011 by Mike

This post thanks to Thea at Queen Anne View.

Seattle’s 17th annual Neighbor Appreciation Day is Saturday, February 12 and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods wants to hear what makes your neighbors so great. Post your good neighbor stories here and read what others are saying about what makes their neighborhood special.

Neighbor Appreciation Day is Seattle’s annual day to reach out to neighbors, create new bonds, and express thanks to those who help make your neighborhood a great place to live. Hundreds of people across Seattle will come together on February 12 (and the week of) to celebrate.

The Department of Neighborhoods is gearing up for Neighbor Appreciation Day by offering a number of ways for community members to get involved, including sending a Neighbor Appreciation Day e-card to your neighbors. You’ll have a choice of two cards designed by Seattle Public Schools students. This card was drawn by 4th grader Angel Corpuz from Dunlap Elementary.

Other ways to get involved: Community members are invited to host their own Neighbor Appreciation Day event in their neighborhoods. Read more about ideas for events, how to plan them, and where to post them, here. Want to share your pictures of NA Day events after the fact? Add them to the Neighbor Appreciation Day Flickr album.

→ No CommentsTags:

Where IS Maple Leaf, anyway? Part 2

September 7th, 2010 by Mike

This weekend’s high-speed police chase, which ended here in a crash, has sparked a revival of the debate: “Where is Maple Leaf?”

The crash occurred on Northeast 75th Street, between Eighth and Sixth avenues.

Michael wrote to say: “The 6oo block of NE 75th is not in Maple Leaf….I believe this location to actually be in the Roosevelt Neighborhood.”

David Miller, from the Maple Leaf Community Council, who should know, chimed in to say: “Maple Leaf’s southern border touches 75th, but the precise location of the incident is just outside Maple Leaf’s official boundaries. Doesn’t mean it isn’t newsworthy, though.”

Problem here is that neither Maple Leaf, nor any other Seattle neighborhood, has official boundaries. Miller is referring to the community council’s adopted map, which looks like this:

According to the council’s map, the crash apparently occurred on  the WRONG SIDE of 75th  street to be in Maple Leaf. Had it occurred on the north side, instead of the south side, of 75th, it would meet David’s definition (I think).

Maple Leaf’s southern boundary is particularly nebulous, and Roosevelt and Maple Leaf are easily, perhaps inevitably, conflated. A blogger in Roosevelt last month tackled this problem and concluded, according to the city’s (unofficial) neighborhood map, that Roosevelt runs all the way north to Northeast 85th Street. Which, as we pointed out a half-year ago, is just silly. It cuts the neighborhood off right in the middle of the Maple Leaf Reservoir.

Now our news partners The Seattle Times have come up with a new crime map, which really confuses things. When you try to check Maple Leaf’s crime on it you’ll not be pleased to learn we’ve had 13 robberies and nine assaults in the past few months. Which is also silly.

What you’re really getting is statistics for the Seattle Police Department’s N3 beat. Which tries to be a combination of Northgate and Maple Leaf, but actually bears little resemblance to our hood. It is split down the middle by Interstate 5 and mostly runs north-south between Northeast 130th and Northeast 90th streets.

Oh, and you’ll find this: “Neighborhood names are approximate and not assigned by Seattle Police.”

→ 10 CommentsTags: ,