News Blog for Seattle's Maple Leaf Neighborhood

 

The Green Skunk moves to Maple Leaf

October 10th, 2013 by master

The Green Skunk, a marijuana dispensary formerly located in Pinehurst at 11231 Roosevelt Way N.E., has moved south into the space vacated by Maple Leaf Massage (now joined by Thrive Physical Therapy) at 9414 Roosevelt Way N.E.

We’ve received a few emails from neighbors wondering if its location just blocks from Olympic View Elementary and The Perkins School violates any laws. Indeed, according to the pot shops map we linked to last month, the Maple Leaf stretch of Roosevelt is not included in the proposed areas where dispensaries will be allowed.

However, under the new proposal to judge distance by “common path” rather than as the crow flies, which is how the rule is enforced federally, The Green Skunk appears to be legit. They might get hassled by the federal government because they’re a few feet shy of 1,000 feet from Olympic View as the crow flies, but perhaps that’s a risk they’re willing to take. (Or maybe they have a more accurate way of calculating distance than Google Maps!)

While we’re on the subject of marijuana dispensaries, we should point out that Delta 9 and MMJ Coop on Lake City Way both have relocated. According to its website, Delta 9 now is located in Sodo at 1950 First Ave. S., while a sign on MMJ says the co-op has moved a half-mile north to 10728 Lake City Way N.E.

Meanwhile, Lake City Conscious Care Cooperative has moved in across the street from MMJ at 8288 Lake City Way N.E.

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Perkins School publishes "Spark" – stories by students

January 11th, 2012 by Mike

Want to meet an owl? Maybe watch a mama grizzly and her cubs at Yellowstone?

How about a Magic Quest? Some dancing mice? A campfire? A raccoon? Life at Lake Chelan, or in China?

Students at Maple Leaf’s Perkins School, 9005 Roosevelt Way N.E., have just published a booklet of two dozen-plus stories – about themselves.

“For me, as a teacher, the most frightening part of releasing an anthology of personal narratives written by fourth- and fifth-graders is the sense of loss of control,” writes their teacher, Rebecca Peterson.

“‘It doesn’t have to be perfect,’ I tell my students many times a week, but today they’re the ones reminding me.

“I think you will find something to be amazed by in each of these stories.”

After printing the anthologies, the students walked copies up and down Roosevelt to the Blue Saucer and Cloud City Coffee.

Both cafes have now run out of copies of Spark, but Rebecca says if folks want to read it she’ll print more up. Just email her at the Perkins School- rpeterson (at) perkinsschool.org

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Perkins School publishes “Spark” – stories by students

January 11th, 2012 by Mike

Want to meet an owl? Maybe watch a mama grizzly and her cubs at Yellowstone?

How about a Magic Quest? Some dancing mice? A campfire? A raccoon? Life at Lake Chelan, or in China?

Students at Maple Leaf’s Perkins School, 9005 Roosevelt Way N.E., have just published a booklet of two dozen-plus stories – about themselves.

“For me, as a teacher, the most frightening part of releasing an anthology of personal narratives written by fourth- and fifth-graders is the sense of loss of control,” writes their teacher, Rebecca Peterson.

“‘It doesn’t have to be perfect,’ I tell my students many times a week, but today they’re the ones reminding me.

“I think you will find something to be amazed by in each of these stories.”

After printing the anthologies, the students walked copies up and down Roosevelt to the Blue Saucer and Cloud City Coffee.

Both cafes have now run out of copies of Spark, but Rebecca says if folks want to read it she’ll print more up. Just email her at the Perkins School- rpeterson (at) perkinsschool.org

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Final work on curb cuts outside ACE

July 8th, 2011 by Mike

Seventeen days ago workers banged and dug and put out signs and destroyed the curbs outside Maple Leaf Ace Hardware and the Perkins School.

Looks like they’re finishing up this afternoon.

Next week we’ll try asking the city Department of Transportation just how much it cost to install these curb cuts on Roosevelt Way Northeast to make the new crosswalk more accessible.

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The Orange Flag Mystery

December 24th, 2010 by Mike

Where, we wonder, do the orange flags come from?

The ones you’ll find at many of the crosswalks on Roosevelt Avenue Northeast, including the three new ones that went in mid-December.

The same afternoon the crosswalks were painted, the orange flags appeared.

Do Maple Leaf neighbors buy the materials and donate the pedestrian flags, as we’re been repeatedly told?

In the comments on an earlier post, David Miller of the Maple Leaf Community Council wrote:

FYI, the orange flags are provided not by the city but through the individual actions of fellow Maple Leaf residents. They buy these with their own money, so please be watchful if you see anyone forget and carry them down the block.

Peg Nielsen of the city transportation department confirmed: “I just spoke with the pedestrian program  folks and they say that the flags are not ours and must indeed be a community effort…so I guess you’ll need to do some more sleuthing!”

But Miller said he doesn’t personally know who the flag elves are. Nor do the folks at the Perkins School, who had lobbied for the new crosswalk between the school and Maple Leaf Ace Hardware.

Nor does Billie Bryan at the Blue Saucer, which has another new crosswalk at its corner. “I have no idea who puts them out there -much as I’d love to take the credit…somehow they always get replenished when they all disappear.”

Who knows where the orange flags originate?

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Learn more about Perkins School at open house

November 30th, 2010 by master

If you’ve been curious about the benefits of sending your child to The Perkins School, 9005 Roosevelt Way N.E., a couple of opportunities to learn more about the private, non-profit school are coming up.

This Sunday, Dec. 5, as well as on Sunday, Jan. 23, parents are invited to attend an open house at the Maple Leaf school from 2-4 p.m., giving them the opportunity to ask questions and hear directly from teachers and current parents about the school, which offers classes from early kindergarten to fifth grade.

Admissions Director Angie Gianelli explained that the school, which limits class sizes at 15 students, follows a “differentiated learning/teaching” technique that is individualized, project-based and hands-on. (You can see just how hands-on The Perkins School is with this earlier post.)

“It has an exceptionally strong science program, which is unusual, and a strong math program,” she said.

Although children aren’t invited to the open houses, Gianelli said that the school does hold a kindergarten day in spring for potential incoming students. Parents also can see classes in action each Wednesday morning during tours at the school, but Gianelli emphasized that the opportunity to speak with teachers and other parents is what’s special about the open houses.

To attend one of the open houses, all you have to do is show up by 2 p.m.; the program starts at 2:15 p.m. However, if you’d like to go on one of the Wednesday tours of the school, call Gianelli at 526-8217 to schedule an appointment.

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A native plant garden to grow at the Perkins School in Maple Leaf

April 27th, 2010 by Mike

For years Maple Leaf’s Perkins School had an unused sliver of a backyard. No more.

Over the winter the fourth- and fifth-grade classes transformed it into a native plant demonstration garden. “We wanted to make our school more sustainable,” said Colt Deese, the school’s science and environmental teacher. “The kids actually had the ideas. They did the planting.”

This charming YouTube video by the school, at 9005 Roosevelt Way N.E., shows the kids constructing the garden far better than we could describe it.

The yard was filled with weeds and broken furniture. The kids cleared the junk and put down cardboard to kill the weeds. Then they started digging.

Seattle Tree Preservation donated a pile of wood-chip mulch. Trees and plants were salvaged. A worm bin and composting food cones appeared. Most of the stuff, including the cardboard, was donated. “Our budget for the entire thing was around $300,” said Deese. [Read more →]

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