News Blog for Seattle's Maple Leaf Neighborhood

 

Snappy Dragon joins 2012 Spoke & Food

May 28th, 2012 by master

Once again, Judy Fu’s Snappy Dragon is doing its part for the Spoke & Food “evening of dining and bikes,” an annual event created by Maple Leaf residents Garett and Heather Slettebak.

From 6-10 p.m. June 26, cyclists are encouraged to pedal to participating restaurants, including Snappy Dragon, 8917 Roosevelt Way N.E., which each have agreed to donate 20 percent or more of the evening’s proceeds to FamilyWorks Family Resource Center & Food Bank.

There are plenty of other nearby restaurants that are participating if you’d like to get in a bit more of a workout, which you can view on the Spoke & Food website.

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Found – a girl’s bicycle

February 27th, 2012 by Mike

Nick emails: “A girl’s bicycle (for about a 10-year-old) showed up in front of my house recently. I’d like to get it back to its owner. My number is 206-327-2037. Call to describe the bike.”

He lives at Roosevelt Way Northeast and Northeast 105th Street.

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Found – a girl's bicycle

February 27th, 2012 by Mike

Nick emails: “A girl’s bicycle (for about a 10-year-old) showed up in front of my house recently. I’d like to get it back to its owner. My number is 206-327-2037. Call to describe the bike.”

He lives at Roosevelt Way Northeast and Northeast 105th Street.

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Found: a lost kids’ bike

May 25th, 2011 by Mike

Rico emails us:

If anyone is missing a kids’ bike, let me know. Someone appears to have abandoned a bike on the street in front of our house a couple days ago. I wonder if someone took it for a joy ride and ditched it.

You can e-mail me a description of any lost bike and I will respond back with an address if it is a match.

rgrassy@gmail.com

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Found: a lost kids' bike

May 25th, 2011 by Mike

Rico emails us:

If anyone is missing a kids’ bike, let me know. Someone appears to have abandoned a bike on the street in front of our house a couple days ago. I wonder if someone took it for a joy ride and ditched it.

You can e-mail me a description of any lost bike and I will respond back with an address if it is a match.

rgrassy@gmail.com

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Mayor McGinn takes a Maple Leaf walk – and fields questions

March 20th, 2011 by Mike


Mayor Mike McGinn at the beaver pond in Thornton Creek Park No. 6.

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn joined around a dozen neighborhood residents – and a dozen or so government staffers – this weekend for a tour of parks, gardens and Thornton Creek.

“I just got to see some of the assets of this neighborhood,” McGinn told a group of about 50 afterward at  a town hall Q-and-A at Aljoya Thornton Place, 450 N.E. 100th St.


Barbara Maxwell, a Maple Leaf Community Council veteran, presents Mike McGinn with a Maple Leaf Community Garden T-shirt as Jenn Zanella looks on.

The tour started at the Northgate Community Center, wound through Thornton Creek Park No. 6 to the Maple Leaf Community Garden, skipped a planned visit to the Northgate Transit Center (for lack of time) and landed at Aljoya after a stop at the Thornton Place commons area.

During the Q-and-A, McGinn stressed that many of the city’s present budget woes are the result of years of deferred maintainance of streets, parks, water systems – all vital infrastructure.

“It’s been a difficult budget-balancing exercise,” he said. “The streets are in really bad condition right now.”

Many of those attending were interested in pedestrian safety and the lack of sidewalks in much of Maple Leaf and Northgate. There were complaints about lack of walkability along Northeast Northgate Way and Roosevelt Avenue Northeast, and at the intersection of Northgate and Eighth Avenue Northeast.

“We’re seeing a desire by many people to live in a more walkable area,” McGinn acknowledged. “We should be prioritizing pedestrian projects. “

The mayor often asked city staffers to follow up on individual questions, including complaints about prostitution on Aurora Avenue North and the proposed “road diet” for Northeast 125th Street. “N.E. 125th has a very steep hill,” McGinn was warned. (Actually, it’s not as steep as one of Maple Leaf’s prime bike commuting routes.)

Asked about proposals to preserve Seattle’s tree canopy, McGinn noted the sensitivity of the issue. A former Sierra Club leader, McGinn wants to save trees. “But how restrictive will we be for people who want to cut down trees on their own property?” he asked.

“This is going to be a hot-button issue.”

(Earlier we posted about McGinn’s comment on the Alaskan Way Viaduct tunnel.)

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Hey! Where’d my lane go (on Roosevelt and Fifth N.E.)?

March 3rd, 2011 by Mike

In casual conversations about the neighborhood over the past few weeks one topic kept coming up. Often. And with feeling.

It wasn’t about crime in the neighborhood, nor about whether we should or should not acknowledge crime in the neighborhood.

It wasn’t about snow, or lack thereof.

It wasn’t even about neighborhood chickens (though expect more chicken updates soon).

It’s about the maddening fact that the yellow center line on Roosevelt Way Northeast is no longer a straight line, but abruptly jogs a couple of feet to one side as you’re driving along.

The effect is that you can drive in a straight line, and suddenly wonder: “Who moved my lane?” You’re something like a third of the way into the oncoming lane.

It’s most obvious between Northeast 85th and Northeast 89th streets, with another bobble at Northeast 92nd Street. (It’s also maddeningly hard to take a photo of.)

People are telling us they feel downright unsafe, and wondering why this happened. The situation is similar on Fifth Avenue Northeast, especially between Northeast 89th and 91st streets.

We remembered it’s related to the bike lane/parking issue on Roosevelt. A couple days ago we asked the city specifically about the yellow strips. Here’s the response, from Carol McMahan, of the transportation department.

We have plans to make adjustments to the tapers on Roosevelt Way NE at NE 85th Street, NE 89th Street, NE 92nd Street and on 5th Avenue NE at NE 89th Street and NE 91st Street to assist drivers in making these transitions. This work should be done later this spring as the weather improves and we get back into our painting season.

These shifts in the centerline were installed to accommodate the new uphill climbing lanes that have been installed for bicyclists on these two roadways. Please feel free to contact me if you have additional questions or concerns about the bike facilities.

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Hey! Where'd my lane go (on Roosevelt and Fifth N.E.)?

March 3rd, 2011 by Mike

In casual conversations about the neighborhood over the past few weeks one topic kept coming up. Often. And with feeling.

It wasn’t about crime in the neighborhood, nor about whether we should or should not acknowledge crime in the neighborhood.

It wasn’t about snow, or lack thereof.

It wasn’t even about neighborhood chickens (though expect more chicken updates soon).

It’s about the maddening fact that the yellow center line on Roosevelt Way Northeast is no longer a straight line, but abruptly jogs a couple of feet to one side as you’re driving along.

The effect is that you can drive in a straight line, and suddenly wonder: “Who moved my lane?” You’re something like a third of the way into the oncoming lane.

It’s most obvious between Northeast 85th and Northeast 89th streets, with another bobble at Northeast 92nd Street. (It’s also maddeningly hard to take a photo of.)

People are telling us they feel downright unsafe, and wondering why this happened. The situation is similar on Fifth Avenue Northeast, especially between Northeast 89th and 91st streets.

We remembered it’s related to the bike lane/parking issue on Roosevelt. A couple days ago we asked the city specifically about the yellow strips. Here’s the response, from Carol McMahan, of the transportation department.

We have plans to make adjustments to the tapers on Roosevelt Way NE at NE 85th Street, NE 89th Street, NE 92nd Street and on 5th Avenue NE at NE 89th Street and NE 91st Street to assist drivers in making these transitions. This work should be done later this spring as the weather improves and we get back into our painting season.

These shifts in the centerline were installed to accommodate the new uphill climbing lanes that have been installed for bicyclists on these two roadways. Please feel free to contact me if you have additional questions or concerns about the bike facilities.

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It’s all uphill to here – a Maple Leaf bike story

August 20th, 2010 by Mike

A cyclist churns up the hill on Fifth Avenue Northeast.

Here’s a different kind of bike story – not cars vs. bicycles, just bike vs. hill.

Amid all the furor over bikes on Northeast 125th Street, just north of us, was this, from a Seattle Times story:

Critics say the road (125th) is too congested — it’s a key route from Interstate 5 to Lake City Way — and the hill, with an 8.5 percent grade, is too steep for bicyclists.

“Nobody rides up that hill on a bicycle,” said resident Mauri Stach, who’s lived in the neighborhood for 44 years.

So we wondered, what with Maple Leaf boasting the third-highest hill in town, just what the grade might be between Green Lake and Maple Leaf?

Many of the local commute cyclists (who DON’T ride on Roosevelt Way Northeast) take Fifth Avenue Northeast up from the lake.

How steep is Fifth? The answer, from Brian Dougherty at the Seattle Department of Transportation, is a whopping 11 percent grade, at its steepest section.

Take that, Pinehurst!

(Wondering about Roosevelt? Dougherty says at its steepest, between Northeast 77 and Northeast 78th Streets, the grade is 5.8 percent.)

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It's all uphill to here – a Maple Leaf bike story

August 20th, 2010 by Mike

A cyclist churns up the hill on Fifth Avenue Northeast.

Here’s a different kind of bike story – not cars vs. bicycles, just bike vs. hill.

Amid all the furor over bikes on Northeast 125th Street, just north of us, was this, from a Seattle Times story:

Critics say the road (125th) is too congested — it’s a key route from Interstate 5 to Lake City Way — and the hill, with an 8.5 percent grade, is too steep for bicyclists.

“Nobody rides up that hill on a bicycle,” said resident Mauri Stach, who’s lived in the neighborhood for 44 years.

So we wondered, what with Maple Leaf boasting the third-highest hill in town, just what the grade might be between Green Lake and Maple Leaf?

Many of the local commute cyclists (who DON’T ride on Roosevelt Way Northeast) take Fifth Avenue Northeast up from the lake.

How steep is Fifth? The answer, from Brian Dougherty at the Seattle Department of Transportation, is a whopping 11 percent grade, at its steepest section.

Take that, Pinehurst!

(Wondering about Roosevelt? Dougherty says at its steepest, between Northeast 77 and Northeast 78th Streets, the grade is 5.8 percent.)

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