News Blog for Seattle's Maple Leaf Neighborhood

 

Entries from March 2012

Snow – mixed with rain – in Maple Leaf for the last day of March

March 31st, 2012 by Mike

This is silly, but at 8:45 a.m. there are snow flakes mixed in with that rain.

As for that rain – 1.45 inches here in the last two days.

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Maple Leaf servicemember looking for a few good athletes

March 30th, 2012 by master

In case you missed the post from Maple Leaf resident Casey Sheehan on our Facebook page, we wanted to make sure you heard about his call out for a few good men and women to compete for a cause.

Sheehan, who is currently on active duty in Kuwait, is getting out of the Navy in July, but he doesn’t plan to let all of his physical labors go to waste. When he gets back, he plans to start training for the Toughmudder obstacle course, and he’s hoping a few neighbors will join him – he’s even named his team Maple Leaf Life!

Those of us who aren’t military trained may have to start training without him, though, since the main Toughmudder website explains that the event, which takes place in Seattle Sept. 29-30, is “Probably the toughest event on the planet”:

Tough Mudder events are hardcore 10-12 mile obstacle courses designed by British Special Forces to test your all around strength, stamina, mental grit, and camaraderie. With the most innovative courses, half a million inspiring participants, and more than $2 million dollars raised for the Wounded Warrior Project, Tough Mudder is the premier adventure challenge series in the world.

If that sounds like too much of a challenge for you but you’d still like to contribute, you also can make a donation on Sheehan’s behalf to the Wounded Warrior Project via this link (he says the link says Strides for Hunger because of a third-party website issue).

And don’t be deterred if you think you might bring down the team. Sheehan emphasizes that this this “not a race but a team thing.” He adds: 

I chose it because its long, tough and about teamwork.  It breaks up the monotony of a marathon by having obstacles, and it seems to be a good time, with a free beer at the end, whats not to love?

If you’re interested, Sheehan asks you to send him an email at captainsheenuts@hotmail.com.

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Why aren’t there more details about this theft in Maple Leaf?

March 29th, 2012 by Mike

Mike emailed us a copy of a police report from Wednesday afternoon. About all that can be learned from it is  that a “theft-oth” was “completed” at 2:26 p.m. in the 8100 block of Latona Avenue Northeast.

It happened here: “STREET/HIGHWAY/ROAD/ALLEY/SIDEWALK.”

“Do you have any other details of the occurrence?” Mike asks.

No, we don’t.

It’s the usual, redacted two-page police report that’s posted online for most “property crimes,” as opposed to crimes committed against people, such as robbery or burglary.

For those, more serious, crimes, the full six-page report is – eventually – posted, although still with redactions.

Having police reports posted online is good government. Having virtually no details attached to the vast majority of the reports is a step backward. We complained about it at a meeting last year with the mayor. Update: Detective Mark Jamieson, a spokesman for Seattle Police, called to say that about a year and a half ago, when the reports went online, staffing drove the decision to initially only post the full reports for major crimes. But, he said, the department is heading in the direction of posting all full reports.

The map at right shows similar thefts that have been reported so far this year. It understates the frequency because many of the icons represent multiple thefts – the one at Northeast Northgate Way/ Fifth Avenue Northeast, for example, stands in for 14 occurrences.

We don’t usually report on, or try and chase down details of, crimes such as shoplifting, mail theft or “theft-other.”  In general we do report anything more serious – there was a shooting late Sunday night at a bar in the 500 block of Northeast Northgate Way, for example – but getting details can take days unless the Seattle Police Department sends out a police blotter post, which in this case they did.

For more on neighborhood crimes, and why we report on them, go here.

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Why aren't there more details about this theft in Maple Leaf?

March 29th, 2012 by Mike

Mike emailed us a copy of a police report from Wednesday afternoon. About all that can be learned from it is  that a “theft-oth” was “completed” at 2:26 p.m. in the 8100 block of Latona Avenue Northeast.

It happened here: “STREET/HIGHWAY/ROAD/ALLEY/SIDEWALK.”

“Do you have any other details of the occurrence?” Mike asks.

No, we don’t.

It’s the usual, redacted two-page police report that’s posted online for most “property crimes,” as opposed to crimes committed against people, such as robbery or burglary.

For those, more serious, crimes, the full six-page report is – eventually – posted, although still with redactions.

Having police reports posted online is good government. Having virtually no details attached to the vast majority of the reports is a step backward. We complained about it at a meeting last year with the mayor. Update: Detective Mark Jamieson, a spokesman for Seattle Police, called to say that about a year and a half ago, when the reports went online, staffing drove the decision to initially only post the full reports for major crimes. But, he said, the department is heading in the direction of posting all full reports.

The map at right shows similar thefts that have been reported so far this year. It understates the frequency because many of the icons represent multiple thefts – the one at Northeast Northgate Way/ Fifth Avenue Northeast, for example, stands in for 14 occurrences.

We don’t usually report on, or try and chase down details of, crimes such as shoplifting, mail theft or “theft-other.”  In general we do report anything more serious – there was a shooting late Sunday night at a bar in the 500 block of Northeast Northgate Way, for example – but getting details can take days unless the Seattle Police Department sends out a police blotter post, which in this case they did.

For more on neighborhood crimes, and why we report on them, go here.

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Scavenger hunt for "Corey – the Compostable Apple Cores" is on!

March 29th, 2012 by master

Starting this week, you’re invited to participate in a a citywide scavenger hunt to find “Corey – the Compostable Apple Cores,” which sounds suspiciously like it has at least one stop right in Maple Leaf.

Called “The Big Dig,” the event is organized by Cedar Grove Composting and Seattle Public Utilities to thank Seattle residents for composting more than 125,000 tons of food and yard waste in 2011.

The scavenger hunt, which started this week and continues through April 11, consists of daily clues on Cedar Grove’s website, which will lead participants to find a “Corey” posted at 30 different retail and community sites in the city.

Every participant who finds a Corey will win a coupon redeemable for a free bag of Cedar Grove Compost, and all participants also will be entered into a daily drawing to win a pass to participate in The Big Dig finals on Saturday, April 14. But becoming a finalist is no walk in the park, although it does take place at Seattle Tilth’s Rainier Beach Urban Farm and Wetlands, where finalists will dig through 30 yards of compost to find $6,000 in hidden treasures, including a $3,000 yard makeover.

Cedar Grove tells us there are three Coreys hidden in and near Maple Leaf. Here are their corresponding clues:

  • This location within an open-air lifestyle center plays host to events with authors, photographers, and artists all while incorporating a love of dirt and gardening.
  • This location, most commonly known for organic foods, started a private nonprofit organization that alleviates poverty through microcredit. Find its location in a neighborhood named after a President of the United States.
  • All 4, 400 of these stores located around the United States are independently owned and operated by local entrepreneurs. This local one is just a walk from a snappy dragon.

I hope all of you get at least that last Corey! If you do, here are the ways you can enter the contest:

  • By submitting the Corey code and participant contact info to Cedar Grove’s website form
  • By emailing the photo of Corey, the Corey code and participant contact information to bigdig@cgcompost.com
  • By emailing the street location and Corey code, along with the participant’s email to bigdig@cgcompost.com

Good luck, composters!

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Olympic View Plant Sale coming up May 4-6

March 28th, 2012 by master

With snow falling in Maple Leaf just two weeks ago, it certainly feels like spring snuck up on us since the weekend. Which means, one of the biggest events in the neighborhood is also nearing: the annual Olympic View Plant Sale, which is scheduled for May 4-6 this year.

Although a lot of of the details are still up in the air, times are already set for 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, May 4; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 5; and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, May 6.
 
Bring the kids Saturday for kids craft time, and if we’re lucky we might even get a visit from Peaks Frozen Custard that day, too. Remember, all proceeds from the event will directly benefit the students of Olympic View Elementary, 1020 N.E. 82nd St., and it’s recommended you shop early for the best selection.

We hope to have more information soon, so check back on our Events page for more details as the event nears, and we’ll see you at the plant sale!

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Sound Transit warns of drilling along light-rail line

March 27th, 2012 by master

That next meeting about construction of Northgate Station can’t come soon enough.

According to an alert sent today by Sound Transit, geo-tech drilling started yesterday and will continue for a few weeks near the future North Link light rail line, along Interstate 5 from about Northeast 84th Street north to where the light rail tunnel will exit at Northeast 97th Street.

The purpose is to evaluate subsurface soil and groundwater conditions to help Sound Transit better understand the underground conditions. These drillings will take place at approximately 13 locations along the North Link alignment behind WSDOT’s fence or sound wall over the next few weeks.

What to expect

  • Hours of work: 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Drilling will take approximately two days to four days at each location lasting up to two weeks.
  • The hole will be drilled between 50-250 feet deep.
  • Drilling equipment will sound similar to a truck engine running with occasional hammering.
  • Pedestrians, bicycles, and motor traffic access around the drilling area will be maintained.
  • In some locations it may be necessary to restrict parking.
  • For more information about construction activities, call the 24-hour construction hotline at 1-888-298-2395 / TTY Relay: 711.

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An illustrated version of Northgate Station, from construction to completion

March 25th, 2012 by master

Eight years before the planned opening of Northgate Station, it can be difficult to visualize the enormity of the construction project and how it will look in the end. But the following illustrated video from Sound Transit does a pretty good job of showing us what we’re in for. 

Perhaps even more informative is the slideshow presented at last week’s open house, which explained many of the measures Sound Transit is taking to limit Maple Leaf’s exposure to construction issues.

So far, it appears the majority of the work will be near the portal exit at Northeast 94th Street and First Avenue Northeast, starting with overhead powerline work estimated in late 2013-2015 along First Avenue, from 94th to Northeast 107th Street.

First Avenue also will bear the brunt of the construction traffic, though plans are to otherwise try to keep trucks at a minimum in the neighborhood (view the truck route on slide 22 on the presentation.)

Although noise will be a bigger topic at the next open house, at this time we’re told there will be noise limits on the construction work from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. weekdays, and from 10 p.m. to 9 a.m. weekends and holidays, and that daytime construction activities will comply with city’s construction noise limits. In addition, plans include 

  • A solid plywood construction screening wall 16 feet in height,
  • Stationary equipment (compressors, generators) enclosed in noise reducing material
  • Trucks – no beeping alarms at night
  • Independent monitoring 

Seattle Transit Blog had a nice writup on the meeting, including an update on the pedestrian bridge from North Seattle Community College to the light-rail station. Although it’s still an option to include in the project, with a price tag of $16 million to $20 million, it still has a long way to go. In the editorial, the Seattle Transit Blog suggested that Sound Transit choose the bridge over building an additional parking garage, which might be needed to replace the 117 stalls that the project will permanent displace. It writes:

Sound Transit is currently bound by the Federal Transit Administration to replace those 117 spaces. Sound Transit could seek an exemption from the FTA – with abundant private parking and the potential for Metro to re-purpose much of their Northgate-Downtown service to feed into the station, we don’t feel forging ahead with parking replacement is a good use of transit dollars.

Do you have a preference between additional parking spaces at the bridge? Any other observations from the meeting or the presentation?

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Roosevelt neighbor warns of possible scam by kids

March 25th, 2012 by master

A neighbor in the Roosevelt neighborhood sent us this email Saturday afternoon, warning of a possible door-to-door scam by a couple of sweet-looking kids:

I live in the Roosevelt neighborhood. Awhile ago today a couple of sweet-looking females, one about 9 and the other mid-late teens, are going door to door asking for money for the younger one’s piano lessons with a teacher named “Aimee Kroll.” We never give money at the door, only food if someone’s hungry, and we route contributions to enterprises we can double-check. So we called Ms Kroll, who is indeed a piano teacher but she never heard of these girls. She said her business card might have been picked up at Starbucks’. These girls are pretty darling and believable. A shame they’re being taught to lie so well.

Did anybody else see this duo over the weekend?

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NW Puppet Center opens Great Depression exhibit

March 25th, 2012 by master


Photos courtesy the Cook/Marks Collection, Northwest Puppet Center.

In a sign of the current times, Northwest Puppet Center, 9123 15th Ave. N.E., has recently opened up its new exhibit, “Cheering up the Great Depression: Puppetry & the WPA.”

Puppets in the exhibit are part of the Cooks/Mark collection of more than 5,000 puppets donated to the Maple Leaf theater. The Puppet Center first debuted the collection with its previous exhibit, the “The World of Puppetry: Treasures from The Cook/Marks Collection,” which it first put on display at Seattle Center.

Dmitri Carter with the Puppet Center explained that they often rotate the exhibit so the kids who visit frequently have fresh puppets to ooh and aah over.

“Kids don’t want to sit still before the show,” he said, “so they’re usually running around the exhibit and running around the playground.”

The new exhibit is strictly Americana, giving it quite a contrast with the previous international exhibit, which featured geishas and other puppets from around the world.

The exhibit is open before and after shows or by appointment, and the next show at the Puppet Center is the 17th century comic marionette opera “Il Girello: The Wheel of Fortune” from April 13-22.

“I think it’s been fun for the families in the neighborhood,” Carter said about the Puppet Center’s location in a residential part of Maple Leaf. “It’s been really great being in this small community, even if we don’t have the kind of visibility we could if we were in downtown.”

For more information, visit the Northwest Puppet Center website or call 206-523-2579.

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