News Blog for Seattle's Maple Leaf Neighborhood

 

Tree down on 105th between 5th and 8th

August 3rd, 2012 by master

Tim warns us that there’s a tree down on 105th between 5th and 8th.

He adds, “Not sure what/when it happened, but somebody must know something since the tree fell on to some power lines.”

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Northgate to lose 18 healthy street trees

July 5th, 2012 by master

Ruth Williams, president of the Thornton Creek Alliance and Beaver Pond Natural Area forest steward, has sent a plea out to fellow urban environmentalists about the removal of 18 healthy street trees from Northeast Northgate Way and Fifth Avenue Northeast, starting as early as July 7.

She says the trees, which have become big enough to provide shelter for pedestrians, are being removed to make way for turning lanes for cars.

However, signs posted on each of the trees states that for each tree removed, the Seattle Department of Transportation will plant two. Williams writes:

We should make sure SDOT means what they say and will replace the trees with specimens of similar size.  Since they will no longer be on the sidewalk shading pedestrians, but out in the median shading vehicles, there will be fewer overhead wires and awnings to contend with.  Will SDOT be able to add a few natives to their tree list and plant some now?

[Read more →]

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Damage at Maple Leaf beaver pond – beavers at risk?

February 10th, 2012 by Mike

Maple Leaf’s Beaver Pond Natural Area has been in the news lately, but not because of the beavers.

We got 94 comments on our initial post about nearly 50 trees being vandalized in December.

Then the Seattle parks department and City Light posted notices that a number of trees in the beaver pond proper, at 8th Avenue Northeast and Northeast 105th Street, had been substantially damaged by the beavers and were “dying or standing dead.

“This created a situation of imminent danger and hazard to the public and a high probability of severe damages to nearby electrical infrastructure and private property from tree failure.”

Then came January’s snow and ice storm.

This week trucks and crews from City Light were at the pond. “We worked with parks and personnel from ecology and took down a number of trees girdled by the beavers,” said the utility’s Scott Thomsen.

Thomsen said a particular problem is very high-voltage transmission lines that carry 230 kilovolts from electrical substations. Those lines are on the pond’s western border, and were in reach of damaged trees. Update: Thomsen emails: “We have transmission and distribution lines in that area. The transmission line is 115 kilovolts. The distribution lines are 26 kilovolts.”

Many of the felled trees will be left in place to provide habitat, and the park department plans to plant replacement trees. “It is our goal to protect the wetland and leave as many snags and large woody debris in the wetland habitat as is feasible,” according to the posted notice.

Now the beavers might be in trouble. [Read more →]

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Who moved my trees?

January 29th, 2012 by Mike

Who knows the answer to this? Emily emails:

I live at the corner of Northeast 80th Street & Roosevelt Way Northeast, and after being out of town for a couple days, we came home to find two midsize trees gone from the parking strip on 80th!

There are some tree parts and some assorted plastic bits from a car left behind… Was there a terrible accident over the weekend? Did someone take offense to the trees and pull them down? I am bewildered!

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City seeks green "tree stewards"

April 6th, 2011 by Mike

Preserving Seattle’s tree canopy is a goal of both the city (Mayor Mike McGinn spoke about it here) and the Maple Leaf Community Council, which shared a Seattle Audubon Society award for preserving the trees at the old Waldo Hospital.

Now David Miller of the community council reminds us that the city is actively looking for tree ambassadors. According to Jana of the city’s Office of Sustainability:

Seattle’s urban forest needs your help! Seattle has a goal to reach 30% canopy cover by 2037, growing from our current 23%. To meet that goal, we need to plant and care for 200,000 net new trees in residential areas; residential areas make up 67% of Seattle. To help meet this goal, we are recruiting Tree Ambassadors who can serve as local neighborhood advocates for our urban trees.

You will work in teams of 2-3 people to develop projects for your neighborhood which could include tree walks, invasive species removal workdays, and/or tree plantings. No previous tree experience necessary, only a desire to learn and a passion for urban greenery. You may apply individually or as a group.

Tree ambassadors are volunteers who, after being trained, work 5-10 hours a month, according to the city.

There’s an individual application here, and a team application here. You can also find them on the city’s Tree Portal page.

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City seeks green “tree stewards”

April 6th, 2011 by Mike

Preserving Seattle’s tree canopy is a goal of both the city (Mayor Mike McGinn spoke about it here) and the Maple Leaf Community Council, which shared a Seattle Audubon Society award for preserving the trees at the old Waldo Hospital.

Now David Miller of the community council reminds us that the city is actively looking for tree ambassadors. According to Jana of the city’s Office of Sustainability:

Seattle’s urban forest needs your help! Seattle has a goal to reach 30% canopy cover by 2037, growing from our current 23%. To meet that goal, we need to plant and care for 200,000 net new trees in residential areas; residential areas make up 67% of Seattle. To help meet this goal, we are recruiting Tree Ambassadors who can serve as local neighborhood advocates for our urban trees.

You will work in teams of 2-3 people to develop projects for your neighborhood which could include tree walks, invasive species removal workdays, and/or tree plantings. No previous tree experience necessary, only a desire to learn and a passion for urban greenery. You may apply individually or as a group.

Tree ambassadors are volunteers who, after being trained, work 5-10 hours a month, according to the city.

There’s an individual application here, and a team application here. You can also find them on the city’s Tree Portal page.

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Q & A from Mayor McGinn's visit last week

March 25th, 2011 by Mike

The Seattle mayor’s office has released a recap of the conversation Mayor Mike McGinn had at Aljoya Thornton Place last Saturday.

We earlier wrote about the mayor’s visit here and about his remarks on Alaskan Viaduct tunnel  here.

In a note to residents who listed their email address on the meeting’s sign-up sheets, McGinn today wrote: “I’ll be getting back to you in the next couple of weeks with answers to the questions about casual laborers at 117th & Aurora, school lunch program cutbacks, a status update on the North Aurora Plan, and whether or not daycare providers are required to wrap cloth diapers in plastic.”

Those were all questions the mayor promised to follow up during the meeting. More of the Q & A can be found here (pdf).

As a sample:

Speaker: I support the tunnel position [referring to Speaker #8]. As for trees, we are not planting enough evergreens. I suggest that the city plant evergreens. What incentives do we have for neighbors to plant new trees?

Mayor: In my budget process I discovered that the City has four different programs for planting trees. We hand out many trees for different purposes.

  • I asked if we can have just one tree program. It turns out that it wouldn’t necessarily save money to have one program, but it may make for a better program.
  • It is still being worked out as to how restrictive will we be towards property owners who have trees on their property and want to take them down. It will be a hot button issue. It may be a lot different than what we have now.
  • The street tree issue is very challenging. We have a list of approved trees and they are not big evergreens.
  • We have the Green Seattle Partnership that does much work to clear invasive plants.
  • I am very nervous about what the State and Federal governments will do which will make us revisit our budget.

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Q & A from Mayor McGinn’s visit last week

March 25th, 2011 by Mike

The Seattle mayor’s office has released a recap of the conversation Mayor Mike McGinn had at Aljoya Thornton Place last Saturday.

We earlier wrote about the mayor’s visit here and about his remarks on Alaskan Viaduct tunnel  here.

In a note to residents who listed their email address on the meeting’s sign-up sheets, McGinn today wrote: “I’ll be getting back to you in the next couple of weeks with answers to the questions about casual laborers at 117th & Aurora, school lunch program cutbacks, a status update on the North Aurora Plan, and whether or not daycare providers are required to wrap cloth diapers in plastic.”

Those were all questions the mayor promised to follow up during the meeting. More of the Q & A can be found here (pdf).

As a sample:

Speaker: I support the tunnel position [referring to Speaker #8]. As for trees, we are not planting enough evergreens. I suggest that the city plant evergreens. What incentives do we have for neighbors to plant new trees?

Mayor: In my budget process I discovered that the City has four different programs for planting trees. We hand out many trees for different purposes.

  • I asked if we can have just one tree program. It turns out that it wouldn’t necessarily save money to have one program, but it may make for a better program.
  • It is still being worked out as to how restrictive will we be towards property owners who have trees on their property and want to take them down. It will be a hot button issue. It may be a lot different than what we have now.
  • The street tree issue is very challenging. We have a list of approved trees and they are not big evergreens.
  • We have the Green Seattle Partnership that does much work to clear invasive plants.
  • I am very nervous about what the State and Federal governments will do which will make us revisit our budget.

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Q & A from Mayor McGinn’s visit last week

March 25th, 2011 by Mike

The Seattle mayor’s office has released a recap of the conversation Mayor Mike McGinn had at Aljoya Thornton Place last Saturday.

We earlier wrote about the mayor’s visit here and about his remarks on Alaskan Viaduct tunnel  here.

In a note to residents who listed their email address on the meeting’s sign-up sheets, McGinn today wrote: “I’ll be getting back to you in the next couple of weeks with answers to the questions about casual laborers at 117th & Aurora, school lunch program cutbacks, a status update on the North Aurora Plan, and whether or not daycare providers are required to wrap cloth diapers in plastic.”

Those were all questions the mayor promised to follow up during the meeting. More of the Q & A can be found here (pdf).

As a sample:

Speaker: I support the tunnel position [referring to Speaker #8]. As for trees, we are not planting enough evergreens. I suggest that the city plant evergreens. What incentives do we have for neighbors to plant new trees?

Mayor: In my budget process I discovered that the City has four different programs for planting trees. We hand out many trees for different purposes.

  • I asked if we can have just one tree program. It turns out that it wouldn’t necessarily save money to have one program, but it may make for a better program.
  • It is still being worked out as to how restrictive will we be towards property owners who have trees on their property and want to take them down. It will be a hot button issue. It may be a lot different than what we have now.
  • The street tree issue is very challenging. We have a list of approved trees and they are not big evergreens.
  • We have the Green Seattle Partnership that does much work to clear invasive plants.
  • I am very nervous about what the State and Federal governments will do which will make us revisit our budget.

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The city has more free trees to give away Saturday

December 16th, 2010 by master

If you missed out on applying for free trees from the city, you’re in luck, because some people who applied for trees from the city’s Trees for Neighborhoods program never claimed them.

These trees will be available on a first-come, first-served basis from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the EarthCorps nursery in Magnuson Park, 6310 N.E. 74th St.

To be eligible, you must be a Seattle resident and plant the trees on your property (to plant them in the sidewalk strip, you need a permit from Seattle Department of Transportaion), and go through a 15-minute planting training. There is a four trees per household limit.

Available species:

  • Little gem magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora ‘Little gem’)
  • Serviceberry* (Amelanchier arborea)
  • Italian plum* (fruiting)
  • Dogwood* (Cornus x ‘Venus’)
  • Shore pine (Pinus contorta)
  • Katsura* (Cercidiphyllum japonicum)
  • Western red cedar (Thuja plicata ‘Excelsa’)
  • Red oak* (Quercus rubra)
  • Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)

*These trees are bare root, rather than in pots. They need to be planted the same day you receive them.

You can call 206-793-2454 to check on the availability of trees before driving to the Magnuson Park nursery. That voicemail message listing available trees will be updated at 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m.

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