News Blog for Seattle's Maple Leaf Neighborhood

 

City asks: "Do you like the way your neighborhood is changing?"

March 9th, 2015 by Mike

Change has arrived in Maple Leaf — $1.3 million houses, traffic gridlock on arterials (Roosevelt Way Northeast, 15th Avenue Northeast, Fifth Avenue Northeast), our new park! — and the city wants to know what we and other neighborhoods think about these changes.

Examining population or job growth is one way to measure change but what about lesser-known measures like transit ridership, tree canopy cover, or academic performance?

We want to hear from you! Tell us what you think tells us the most about how your neighborhood is changing by taking our quick poll to indicate which five topics are most important to you. It’s impossible to measure how a city neighborhood changes with just one measure.

The survey suggests 21 different topics, from crime to farmers’ markets, and also has the option to write in a different topic. The link to the poll is:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SEA2035

The poll, by the city’s Department of Planning Urban Development, is tied to Seattle’s Urban Village Strategy and the city’s Comprehensive Plan.

As as it happens, our news partner The Seattle Times has an updated interactive tool: Mapping King County’s Disappearing Middle Class.

Keying off newly released data — “since 2000, 95 percent of new households in King County have been either rich or poor. A mere 5 percent could be considered middle income” – The Times has broken down new growth by census tract.

Of interest, in southwest Maple Leaf (census tract 20) 57 percent of new growth has been in high-income households. By contrast, just across Interstate 5 from Northgate (census tract 210) 100 percent of growth has been low income.

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City asks: “Do you like the way your neighborhood is changing?”

March 9th, 2015 by Mike

Change has arrived in Maple Leaf — $1.3 million houses, traffic gridlock on arterials (Roosevelt Way Northeast, 15th Avenue Northeast, Fifth Avenue Northeast), our new park! — and the city wants to know what we and other neighborhoods think about these changes.

Examining population or job growth is one way to measure change but what about lesser-known measures like transit ridership, tree canopy cover, or academic performance?

We want to hear from you! Tell us what you think tells us the most about how your neighborhood is changing by taking our quick poll to indicate which five topics are most important to you. It’s impossible to measure how a city neighborhood changes with just one measure.

The survey suggests 21 different topics, from crime to farmers’ markets, and also has the option to write in a different topic. The link to the poll is:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SEA2035

The poll, by the city’s Department of Planning Urban Development, is tied to Seattle’s Urban Village Strategy and the city’s Comprehensive Plan.

As as it happens, our news partner The Seattle Times has an updated interactive tool: Mapping King County’s Disappearing Middle Class.

Keying off newly released data — “since 2000, 95 percent of new households in King County have been either rich or poor. A mere 5 percent could be considered middle income” – The Times has broken down new growth by census tract.

Of interest, in southwest Maple Leaf (census tract 20) 57 percent of new growth has been in high-income households. By contrast, just across Interstate 5 from Northgate (census tract 210) 100 percent of growth has been low income.

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Deadline tomorrow for Northgate design feedback

September 29th, 2013 by master

The arrival of light rail isn’t the only thing that’s coming to Northgate in the next eight years.

The city is also in the process of developing the appropriate urban framework to support a new and improved transit center in the area, which means the chances it will affect Maple Leaf are about 100 percent.

Luckily, your opinion is sought on the draft of the so-called Northgate Urban Design Framework, but you only have until tomorrow, Sept. 30, to submit feedback. The draft plan:

  • Identifies key design concepts for Northgate’s Urban Center to create a healthier, more livable, and denser mixed-use community with more houses and shopping opportunities
  • Illustrates recommended street improvements for pedestrians, bicyclists, drivers, and transit users
  • Identifies design advice for the area closest to the light rail station, where future development will add to the growing area

Goals of the plan are to: [Read more →]

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Tell the state’s Transportation Commission what priorities should be

October 7th, 2011 by master

Here’s your chance to make your voice heard on transportation issues in our region.

The Washington State Transportation Commission has created an online survey so people can tell local and state leaders what our transportation priorities should be. This is an opportunity for you to help shape the future of your local, regional, and statewide transportation system.

The survey asks what type of transportation is most important to you, how it should be paid for, how tolling revenue should be used, and similar questions.

Find the survey at http://www.voiceofwashingtonsurvey.org/. It takes about 20-30 minutes to complete.

The Transportation Commission provides a public forum for transportation policy development. It reviews and assesses the entire transportation system and issues the state’s 20-year Transportation Plan. It also adopts tolls for state highways and bridges and fares for Washington State Ferries.

The survey is part of the Commission’s statewide outreach program; the Commission asked King County to help inform people about it. Findings will be reported to the Governor, Legislature, policy makers, and advisory groups such as the Connecting Washington Task Force.

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Aging & Disability Services asks community input for new plan

March 24th, 2011 by master

King County’s Aging and Disability Services (ADS) wants community input for its new Area Plan on Aging, which will guide its work from 2012-2015.

ADS is a division of the Seattle Human Services Department, and works with King County and United Way to improve the health and quality of life for seniors and adults with disabilities, connect them with resources, and provide support to caregivers.

ADS wants residents of any age to complete an online questionnaire.

We especially encourage people who are age 60 or older, adults with disabilities, and family caregivers to respond.

Responses from this questionnaire will inform development of strategies to promote quality of life, independence and choice for older people and adults with disabilities, which will be carried out over the next four years.

Everybody is aging, so everybody should care.

For more information about the Area Plan on Aging, contact ADS planner Karen Winston at 206-684-0706.

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