News Blog for Seattle's Maple Leaf Neighborhood

 

City reveals public emergency alert and notification system “AlertSeattle”

August 4th, 2015 by Mike

This post courtesy of our sister site My Ballard.

Seattle police officers, firefighters and emergency management staff are spreading the word about AlertSeattle, a new, real-time emergency alert and notification system. With AlertSeattle ready for action, Seattle now has a convenient way to send messages to the public with information on what to do when emergencies like earthquakes, explosions, flooding or other disasters happen.

In addition to emergency alerts, the public can also sign-up  for the free system to receive community notifications about severe weather, safety, health, utility service disruptions, major traffic incidents, preparedness events and more.

AlertSeattle will provide real-time emergency alerts and notifications, serving as a unified and official voice from the City of Seattle,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “These notifications will improve safety in our city and help inform city residents and visitors of potentially lifesaving actions they may need to take during emergency events.”

Barb Graff, Director of Seattle’s Office of Emergency Management, encourages Seattle residents and visitors to enroll. “With AlertSeattle, individuals receive official communication directly from the City of Seattle. People can customize what alerts they want to receive and how they want to be notified. Getting good information out quickly is critical during emergencies, and AlertSeattle is an excellent tool for people to stay informed.”

If you live, work, travel through or visit Seattle, you are invited to sign up at alert.seattle.gov. The service itself is provided by the City of Seattle.

→ No CommentsTags: ,

Ten-month work begins to fix Maple Leaf Reservoir

May 21st, 2015 by Mike

Signs are up at Maple Leaf Reservoir Park saying 10 months of earthquake retrofitting will begin soon.

Expect: Trucks and construction equipment around and within the park (see graphic).

Do Not Expect: Tearing up our (almost) new park.

It was stressed that none of the reservoirs will have to be dug back open for these retrofits – the work will be done inside, with crews and equipment accessing through existing maintenance hatches.

Why is this happening? Because the underground reservoirs were built to above-ground specifications. That’s why.

→ No CommentsTags: , ,

How will they fix our underground reservoir (yes, the one with the new park on top)?

September 12th, 2014 by Mike

Since the beginning of summer, when Seattle Public Utilities agreed that its four underground reservoirs – including ours – might fail in a catastrophic earthquake, a good question has been: What will the city do about it?

Now the West Seattle Blog has at least a partial answer.

The West Seattle Reservoir, together with the Maple Leaf, Beacon Hill and Myrtle reservoirs, need retrofitting after it was discovered contractors used a construction formula designed for above ground, not underground, reservoirs.

Yes, we know the new Maple Leaf Reservoir Park – on top of the underground reservoir – just opened last fall.

First on the list for retrofitting is West Seattle, which went into service four years ago. The work is expected to cost over $7 million.

According to an earlier West Seattle Blog post (and one of ours, too): “First thing you should know is: SPU says the reservoirs ‘are in no danger of catastrophic failure,’ even without the retrofits.”

It was stressed that none of the reservoirs will have to be dug back open for these retrofits – the work will be done inside, with crews and equipment accessing through existing maintenance hatches.

This week the West Seattle Blog reported work is about to start on the reservoir there and will run through March. It also posted a copy of the construction notice (pdf).

It says, in part:

→ 4 CommentsTags: , ,

City now thinks Maple Leaf's underground reservoir might fail in catastrophic quake

June 19th, 2014 by Mike

Update: Seattle Public Utilities has now (mid-morning) issued a press release:

SPU Director Ray Hoffman said the utility has been working collaboratively with the reservoirs’ designer, Denver-based MWH, to recover the costs of the retrofits. The rigorous seismic analysis was set in motion in March 2011 after MWH notified SPU of possible seismic deficiencies in their work.

“MWH has been working with us, voluntarily paying costs incurred and cooperating every step of the way — and we expect that to continue,” said Hoffman. “When the dust settles on these projects, we believe we will still be at or below the original budget, and that utility rates will be unaffected by the retrofits.”

Hoffman emphasized that without the retrofits — even in a monster quake — the reservoirs are in no danger of catastrophic failure, and they pose no risk to public safety. And he said SPU will work to minimize disruption of activities in the city parks that have been built atop the reservoirs.

———————————————

Inside the Maple Leaf reservoir before it was filled. Photo courtesy Dane Doerflinger Photography

The city and its contractors now believe that the four underground reservoirs that serve Seattle, including the one under Maple Leaf Reservoir Park, might fail in a catastrophic earthquake.

Our news partner The Seattle Times has the story here. Our earlier piece, saying Seattle Public Utilities was looking into the problem, is here.

From today’s Times story:

In September, the city will begin the estimated $7.6 million process of retrofitting the West Seattle Reservoir, based on a series of high-tech simulations that found the 30 million-gallon water vault could suffer leaks substantial enough to empty it in days to weeks.

It’s likely the city’s three other underground reservoirs — Maple Leaf, Beacon Hill and Myrtle — will require similar retrofitting, and the price to strengthen all four could range from $25 million to $30 million, said Andy Ryan, spokesman for Seattle Public Utilities.

The utility began investigating the seismic deficiencies in March 2011, after the engineering company that designed the reservoirs, MWH, disclosed it had made an error in evaluating whether the structures would meet code using industry-standard calculations, which are based on aboveground reservoirs instead of underground ones, Ryan said.

One engineer: “It wouldn’t be a catastrophic immediate rush of water, but you’d start to lose water. You wouldn’t have any water left after a short period of time.”


→ 26 CommentsTags: ,

City now thinks Maple Leaf’s underground reservoir might fail in catastrophic quake

June 19th, 2014 by Mike

Update: Seattle Public Utilities has now (mid-morning) issued a press release:

SPU Director Ray Hoffman said the utility has been working collaboratively with the reservoirs’ designer, Denver-based MWH, to recover the costs of the retrofits. The rigorous seismic analysis was set in motion in March 2011 after MWH notified SPU of possible seismic deficiencies in their work.

“MWH has been working with us, voluntarily paying costs incurred and cooperating every step of the way — and we expect that to continue,” said Hoffman. “When the dust settles on these projects, we believe we will still be at or below the original budget, and that utility rates will be unaffected by the retrofits.”

Hoffman emphasized that without the retrofits — even in a monster quake — the reservoirs are in no danger of catastrophic failure, and they pose no risk to public safety. And he said SPU will work to minimize disruption of activities in the city parks that have been built atop the reservoirs.

———————————————

Inside the Maple Leaf reservoir before it was filled. Photo courtesy Dane Doerflinger Photography

The city and its contractors now believe that the four underground reservoirs that serve Seattle, including the one under Maple Leaf Reservoir Park, might fail in a catastrophic earthquake.

Our news partner The Seattle Times has the story here. Our earlier piece, saying Seattle Public Utilities was looking into the problem, is here.

From today’s Times story:

In September, the city will begin the estimated $7.6 million process of retrofitting the West Seattle Reservoir, based on a series of high-tech simulations that found the 30 million-gallon water vault could suffer leaks substantial enough to empty it in days to weeks.

It’s likely the city’s three other underground reservoirs — Maple Leaf, Beacon Hill and Myrtle — will require similar retrofitting, and the price to strengthen all four could range from $25 million to $30 million, said Andy Ryan, spokesman for Seattle Public Utilities.

The utility began investigating the seismic deficiencies in March 2011, after the engineering company that designed the reservoirs, MWH, disclosed it had made an error in evaluating whether the structures would meet code using industry-standard calculations, which are based on aboveground reservoirs instead of underground ones, Ryan said.

One engineer: “It wouldn’t be a catastrophic immediate rush of water, but you’d start to lose water. You wouldn’t have any water left after a short period of time.”


→ 26 CommentsTags: ,

Earthquake on Lake City Way this morning – anybody feel it?

July 12th, 2013 by Mike

An earthquake of magnitude 2.6 was reported  a few blocks northeast of Maple Leaf just before 7 a.m.

The quake, centered essentially at Lake City Way Northeast and Northeast 120th Street, is shown in red on this map from the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network.

It occurred at 6.56 a.m. and was 9.3 miles underground, according to the network.

A second quake, magnitude 2.3,  occurred just after 7:30 a.m. near Redmond.

We first heard of both from our news partners The Seattle Times.

→ 2 CommentsTags: , ,